Victims of the white man attack at Spur must sue the corporation

PBM

Now that Spur Corporation has come around from its ridiculously defensive reaction to the attack of a black woman by a highly aggressive white man in one of its Johannesburg outlets, one must ask: how does this affect the rights of the victims of this incident. Should they sue Spur?

Victims refers to the woman who was accosted at the Texamo Spur in The Glen Shopping Centre and the many other people, children and adults who were exposed to the abuse which was captured on camera and distributed via social media. Surely they have case of negligent infliction of emotional distress or something along those lines.

Spur Corporation issued a statement this week where they profess to have gone through some deep introspection and concluded that they were in the wrong. Their statement suggests that they were in the wrong not only on how they reacted to the incident but for running with glaring gaps in their outlets that may have allowed for this incident to occur.

The statement which can be read here borders on admission of guilt that the corporation has been negligent in the running of its business. It’s comparable to a bungee jumping operator who after an accident, turns and say I’m sorry for providing a poor safety belt.

Spur Corporation is a huge JSE listed business which should have known better and deserves to be punished for this incident. It is a R633 million business which owns a string of chain restaurant franchises including Spur. Others are Panarottis, John Dory’s, Captain DoRegos, The Hussar Grill, RocoMamas and Casa Bella.

In its statement Spur Corporation says “In the month since the widely publicised incident at Texamo Spur in The Glen Shopping Centre in Johannesburg, everyone at Spur has had time to reflect on our actions leading up to, during and after the event.

Spur would like to take this opportunity to unreservedly apologise to the South African public. Our response fell short of our own high standards. We should have done better. We expect it from ourselves to do better and we believe that the South African public deserve better.

It was an intensive period of self-reflection for everyone at Spur and with the wisdom of hindsight, we have decided to embark on a course of action to address the shortcomings in our response.”

Spur Corporation has resolved to commission an independent investigation headed by a professor of law, Elmien du Plessis. The professor will convene a panel that will do “an in-depth investigation into all relevant aspects of the incident  on 19 March 2017 and how it was handled”

The company adds that “regardless of the outcome and recommendations of the panel, certain immediate steps are called for.” These include increasing the child-minder to child ratio in its Play Canyons, formal re-education drive of the child minders.

It concludes that “In the month since this incident, we have learned many lessons. We are implementing steps to ensure the safety of customers and personnel at our restaurants.”

ProBonoMatters is of the view that the affected people must sue spur. What do you think?

This piece was lifted from ProBonoMatters

info@probonomatters.co.za

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