Businessman launches transformation magazine

A Johannesburg-based publisher and businessman, Saki Mabhele, today said TransformSA, a new sassy quarterly publication covering transformation and BEE issues, would hit the shelves on Friday this week. Developed by Mabhele and his business partners, TransformSA will is distributed throughout the country.

Mabhele said TransformSA focuses on providing hard core analysis of BEE, digging into previous and current BEE and BB-BEE deals in a bid to find loopholes, weaknesses and strengths. “We want to apply investigative journalism skills to root out fronting. We may also consider naming and shaming the enemies of transformation,” said Mabhele.

The publication also celebrates success stories of black-owned companies and will also do so about various organisations which have been at the forefront of transformation. It covers changes in legislation and zooms in on institutions set up by government in efforts to develop BEE.

It will also strive to check whether policy changes and business transactions which have taken place in the past 17 years of South Africa’s democracy really address the economic imbalances of the past.

Each issue contains at least 178 pages of news features, fresh in-depth analysis and well-written opinion pieces on BEE issues. The magazine combines easy-to-digest BEE coverage with a cutting-edge design. It aims to make it really easy for readers to follow and understand general transformation and BEE.

BEE expert Ajay Lalu and Neren Rau, the CEO of the South African Chamber of Commerce & Industry (SACCI) are part of the contributing team.  “We’re thrilled to have a team and a magazine that provides fresh, knowledgeable and expert industry insights for our readers. We’ve assembled a stellar contributing team – a who’s who in the industry and journalism – to ensure TransformSA is an independent and modern multi-platform magazine that will engage the most enthusiastic readers,” said Mabhele.

“By developing TransformSA, with its compelling content, we hope to create a trusted go-to resource for politicians, chief executives, chairmen, non-executive and executive directors.”

“To me it seems unlikely that the past 17 years could have been enough to address imbalances of the past,” said Mabhele, adding it had become more critical to address issues of economic inclusion in one way or the other. “We need to educate both black and white South Africans about the necessity of economic empowerment.”

Mabhele has worked on leading business titles such as The Thinker, Leadership MagazineAfrican LeaderBlack Business Quarterly and CapeAfrica.

 

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